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When to Switch From Kitten to Adult Cat Food?

Oscillot North America
Endorsed by Nature Canada, Animal Welfare League of Australia

When to Switch From Kitten to Adult Cat Food?

Cat looking at a pie

Photo by Danil Aksenov on Unsplash

One of the joys of being a cat owner is watching your kitten grow through different life stages. We know you’re committed to taking good care of your feline companion as they grow, and we’re always here to help.

If you’re starting to think about switching from kitten to cat food, it’s important to get the timing right. A gradual approach to switching is also essential.

We’ve prepared an article to guide you through the process.


So, when should I switch from kitten to cat food? 

Yes! We’re so glad you asked. It seems there is a magic number: 12 months.

Experts agree that you should transition your kitten to adult food right around their first birthday. There is one exception: larger breed cats. Larger breed cats should be on a growth diet for longer: typically about 18 months – 2 years.

For all breeds, we recommend consulting a veterinarian for advice on the perfect time to transition to a new diet. We also recommend monitoring your cat’s weight and health as you make the change.


cat eating kitten eating

Why switch at all? Are cats and kittens really that different?

Yes, kittens and cats have very different nutritional needs.

In a nutshell, kittens need food to grow. They need extra protein and additional calories, which is why it’s important to feed them specially-formulated kitten food (yum!) Kittens also require extra amino acids, minerals and vitamins in their diet.

So, what happens if you continue to feed your adult cat kitten food? You likely end up with a larger, and more importantly, less healthy cat. This is especially true if your cat spends their time indoors and does not have the benefit of increased physical activity.

Read Indoor vs Outdoor - what is best for your cat? to learn about the risks and benefits of an outdoor environment.


cat naps, adult cat sleeping

Life Stages

Nutritionally speaking, there are actually three different life stages for cats. The kitten life stage, the adult stage and the senior stage. Some experts break these down further. For optimal health and happiness, it’s important to feed your feline friend the right food, at the right time.

When you’re out shopping for kitten (or cat) food, be sure you’re reading the labels properly. They will tell you whether the food is designed for kittens or mature cats.

Making the Switch

Cat in a birthday hat

Your cat is about to celebrate their first birthday (happy birthday to your cat!) You’re ready to make the switch and start them on an adult diet. We’re here to help.

Here’s the thing with cats: they need to learn how to digest their new food, gradually. This means change should never be instant (or you could end up dealing with a bad case of kitty vomiting/diarrhea). You’ve been warned.

Experts recommend transitioning from kitten to adult food over a 7-day period.

Here’s how:
- Days 1 and 2 – feed your cat 75% kitten food and 25% adult cat food (mix both together in one bowl)
- Days 3 and 4 – 50% kitten food. 50% adult food
- Days 5 and 6 – 25% kitten food; 75% adult food
- Day 7 – 100% adult food (transition complete) 

We hope that these tips helped and that you’ll feel comfortable making a safe and simple transition to cat food.

Most importantly, don’t forget to celebrate your cat’s first birthday once you’ve completed the switch! While we definitely don’t recommend birthday cake, cat treats are a safe and tasty alternative.

Have a Question or Comment? Check out our Forum

Oscillot North America

© 2020 Oscillot® North America 

Is My Cat Sleeping Too Much?

Oscillot North America
Endorsed by Nature Canada, Animal Welfare League of Australia

Is My Cat Sleeping Too Much?

Cat sleeping all day

Photo by Ben Wicks on Unsplash

So, your cat sleeps a lot — so much, in fact, that sometimes you start to wonder if you should worry.

We’re here to reassure you.

The next time you find yourself wondering “is my cat sleeping too much?” remember that cats sleep a whopping 16 hours in a 24-hour period, on average. Some healthy adult cats sleep up to 20 hours. We know, right? Lucky cats. The last time we had a sleep even half as great was probably in the ‘80s.


Cats sleep to conserve energy. They’re biologically wired to rest for longer periods, so that later, they have what it takes to hunt and kill their prey. Yes, your friendly feline is still wild at heart (even if they’re typically hunting their favourite toy mouse).

Cat naps (the best!)

Your cat may be sleeping 16-20 hours a day, but remember, cat sleep is not the same as human sleep. Cats get about 5 minutes of deep sleep, then take “cat naps” that usually last 15-30 minutes. Even in the middle of a nap, they’re ready to get up and pounce if required. They also tend to experience bursts of energy and activity (they’re at their most active at dawn and dusk).


What about kittens? Older cats?

Kittens typically sleep through most of the day with brief active periods between meals.

Adolescent cats usually have irregular sleep patterns. Average hours of sleep/day: 18

Adult cats will develop a more regular sleep pattern. Average hours of sleep/day: 16

Older cats have less energy and sleep more. Average hours of sleep/day: 18

cat naps, adult cat sleeping

So, is my cat sleeping too much? Should I worry?

While a sleepy cat is absolutely normal, it is important to pay attention to changes to your cat’s established sleep pattern. A cat that is suddenly sleeping more could potentially be sick or in pain.

If it looks like your cat is having trouble laying down or getting up after a nap, this could point to a possible issue. Also, a healthy cat will typically respond fairly quickly to the sound of their food being prepared (usually even when they’re napping).

At the end of the day, you know your cat best. Are they tired and lethargic more often? Are you noticing any other signs of discomfort? Do you feel that something just isn’t right? A consultation with the vet will help you understand the root cause of your cat’s behaviour changes.

Is my cat sleeping too much, should I worry

What if my cat is not sleeping?

On the other hand, if a cat seems hyperactive or restless, is not sleeping through the night, or is acting aggressively, this could point to hyperthyroidism. The disease often comes with other symptoms like weight loss, increase in appetite, rapid heart rate, thirst, vomiting, diarrhea, or an unkempt, greasy or matted coat. If you suspect hyperthyroidism, definitely consult a vet.

Naturally, the amount of time your cat sleeps can fluctuate and can actually be affected by changes in the weather and the seasons.

At the end of the day, remember that cats are big sleepers. If your cat sleeps a lot, but it’s fairly consistent, no need to worry.

As for those rare moments when your cat is wide awake, we recommend taking full advantage.

Consider letting your cat enjoy the great outdoors (with all safety precautions in place, of course). Read Indoor vs Outdoor - what is best for your cat? to learn about the benefits and risks of an outdoor environment.


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Have a Question or Comment? Check out our Forum

Oscillot North America

© 2020 Oscillot® North America 

4 Cat Fence Solutions for Your Backyard

Cat-proof fence rollers | Oscillot North America
Endorsed by Nature Canada, Animal Welfare League of Australia

4 Cat Fence Solutions for Your Backyard

Cat-proof fence paddle kits by Oscillot: Cat Fence, Cat proof fence, Cat fence rollers, Cat Fence topper, cat containment system, Oscillot cat fence, Cat containment fence, Cat proof fence topper, Outdoor Cats,

Oscillot® Cat Containment System

During the recent years, humans have been drastically changing their attitude towards an idea of pet ownership. We no longer think of being an owner of a cat or a dog, but rather acquiring a life companion, a new family member. We take care of our pets, give them our love, try to earn their respect, and do our best to make them happy. 


Many cat owners are being torn on the idea whether they should keep their cats in the safety of indoors or let them enjoy freedom of the outside environment. Luckily, there are now a few paths that cat owners can take without having to choose between safety and happiness of their pets by installing a cat fence containment solution in their backyard. 


>> Read: Indoor vs Outdoor - what is best for your cat? 


We have previously introduced several different safety measures you may consider before letting your cat enjoy the outside of your home. The goal of many cat owners is to provide their cats with the largest possible free-roaming area, while keeping them in a safe space. A cat-proof fence around the perimeter of your property is the best way to achieve this goal. So, how to keep cat in backyard? Below we summarize cat fencing solutions available on the market:  

Oscillot® Cat-Proof Fence Kits

Cat-proof fence paddle kits by Oscillot: Cat Fence, Cat proof fence, Cat fence rollers, Cat Fence topper, cat containment system, Oscillot cat fence, Cat containment fence, Cat proof fence topper, Outdoor Cats,

Oscillot® is the unique spinning paddle system made from rust proof aluminum, designed for cat-proofing your existing fence. Cats use a jump-grab-climb technique to scale and escape over fences. Oscillot® is designed to safely counteract this technique by eliminating the GRAB action. When a cat tries to jump and scale the fence, they place a paw on the paddle, which then spins. The cat cannot get traction and falls safely back to the ground.


It is made to withstand any weather conditions and last you for a lifetime, all while complimenting your fence and backyard design. Oscillot® is completely safe and will not cause any harm to your cat or wildlife. It is designed for DIY installation to existing fences of at least 6 feet in height - including metal, timber, masonry, vinyl, composite, and chain-link fencing to keep pets safe and active in their own yard. 


>> Check out Oscillot® Customer Installations


Oscillot® is the ideal choice for cat owners wanting to keep their feline family members safely contained within their property without compromising the aesthetics of their yard or having to maintain the integrity of the system. It is endorsed by Nature Canada, Animal Welfare League of Australia and over 5000 cat owners worldwide.  

Other Cat Fence Roller Systems

coyote rollers , fence topper

There are various designs that utilize PVC and metal pipes to try and prevent animals from grabbing the fence top upon an attempt to jump over the fence. Effectiveness of these solutions can differ widely as they have not been designed or properly tested to contain cats in the first place. A good example of such a system is a coyote roller that was initially designed to keep coyotes out of your backyard.

Freestanding  Cat Fences and Net Extensions

cat fence netting, purrfect fence, chain link fence

If you do not have an existing fence surrounding your property, a freestanding cat fence may be an appropriate solution for you to consider. 


Such fences are usually made of metal posts and mesh wire, extended by a few feet in height and bent inwards. If tall enough, they might be a suitable option for preventing your cat’s escape. Additionally, unlike the privacy fence, it does not block the view from your property. 


Alternatively, there are available net extensions bent inward to install on your existing fence to achieve a similar effect.

Remote  Cat Fence

electric shock collar for cat containment

Remote electric fence is another choice of outdoor pet enclosure. It is designed to stop a pet from leaving further than a certain area of your choice. The result is achieved by sending a small electric current to your pet’s collar when they reach the borderline of the marked area. The discomfort of a gentle stun in the neck is meant to teach a pet where they should or should not go. Although it has proven to be generally effective for dog training, many may consider this method to be inhumane.


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Have a Question or Comment? Check out our Forum

Oscillot North America

© 2020 Oscillot® North America